Fear can’t hurt you anymore than a dream, 2011
Play, 2010
Here, invisible yet strong, was the taboo of the old life, 2011
The world, that understandable and lawful world, was slipping away, 2011
The sun in his eyes reminded him of how time was passing, 2009
Play, 2010
Fear can’t hurt you anymore than a dream, 2011
The buzz from the hunters was one of admiration at this handsome behaviour, 2012
The world, that understandable and lawful world, was slipping away, 2011
The boys looked at each other, fearfully. Unbelieving, 2010
The first rhythm they became used to was the slow swing from dawn to quick dusk, 2011
The delight of a realised ambition overcame him, 2011
He became absorbed beyond mere happiness as he felt himself exercising control over living things, 2011
There were no words, and no movements but the tearing of teeth and claws, 2011
The knowledge and the awe made him savage, 2011
You can't tell what he might do, 2012
We’ve got to have rules and obey them. After all, we’re not savages, 2012
We was on the outside. We never done nothing, we never seen nothing, 2011
He came at last to a place where more sunshine fell, 2010
The shameful knowledge grew in them and they did not know how to begin confssion, 2010
The breezes that on the lagoon had chased theiere finding their way across the platform and into the forest, 2012
He found himself understanding the wearisomeness of this life, where every path was an improvisation, 2010
If you’re scared of someone you hate him but you can’t stop thinking about him, 2012
You could have had everyone when the shelters were finished. But you had to hunt, 2012
Daddy said they haven't found all the animals in the sea yet, 2012
Maybe there is a beast....maybe it's only us, 2012

Catalogue essay on Play

The image titled 'Play' from the series of the same name won the New York Photo Awards 2011 for 'Best Personal Work as Photographic Image'. It was selected to exhibit in the New York Photo Invitational 2012 and was a finalist in the Australian National Photographic Portrait Prize 2011. A second image from the series, 'Fear is Nothing More Than a Dream', was a finalist in the Moran Contemporary Photographic Prize 2012 and the Foto8 Summershow 2012, London.


On Play: catalogue essay

The slow, painterly intensity of the images invites us to imagine Sarah on the banks of the Break O'Day River in Tasmania, an outdoor studio in which to direct her own romance of childhood through a patient band of child subjects. In fact, Sarah was brought into the very active playworlds of the children and allowed to watch. Her patient eye has produced these rich stories in a frame.


There is an otherworldly sensibility about Play, perhaps because it captures a childhood that we associate with generations before our own, and perhaps because the children are intent on maintaining the reality of their imaginary playworld.


The intensity of the children's concentration, facing off with the camera, and the complexity of their play on the riverbanks and the woodlands beyond, belies the idea of a child's play. This is serious business and the children are unequivocally in charge.


However, the deepest poetry of Play may be the mirror it holds to the adult gaze. It does not necessarily (as our first adult impulse may lead us to think) give us a sneak peek into the secret world of children. The children possess both agency and power. Other than the fact that they are children, there is not much that is “childish†in these images. They are playing at being adults, playing at life. And they are playing with Sarah (and us), luxuriating in the power and freedom they have afforded themselves in this real-imaginary domain. As William Golding writes in Lord of the Flies there is 'a kind of glamour [spreading] over them and the scene and they [are] conscious of the glamour and made happy by it'.


Sarah has inscribed her work with the themes from Lord of the Flies, entitling the images with Golding's words of innocence (being) lost; glimpses of transcendent beauty; and a journey through fear, to the other side. As they play, the children (or should I call them small adults?) are armed to the teeth, under threat from something that they cannot see (the 'Beast' in Lord of the Flies), in battle formation – guns, axes and bows and arrows bristling for action. They are obsessed with shelter and warmth, with the need to guard against the worst of nature, exhausting themselves with industry. They are preparing for the worst. But they make time to enjoy the surrounds from time to time and even allow themselves to rest, making contented peace with the contours of the landscape.


They have ritualised the spaces in which they play – red feathers mark the cubbyhouse the children built, and the arrows that protect it. And they govern themselves within a quiet hierarchy of age, skill and knowledge. They are out in the 'real world', doing what it takes to survive.


They have a keen sense that not everyone will make it, having shared in the loss of a loved one not long before Sarah began making the series. They are actively exploring grief and loss, and their chatter, as they busy themselves 'surviving', is often about the best of way of getting out of tight spots, and the various ways in which one could die.


This series was shot over a three year period and continues (2008 - present). The sophistication of play developed as the children became older. They began by building cubbyhouses (many of which burnt down). At eight years of age, they were playing with handmade guns. By the age of ten, they were crafting bows and arrows, sharpening the arrows, shafts with knives. And by twelve, mirroring the adult world around them, they began a logging business and began to build more substantial homes for themselves. They began to build shelters with proper foundations and footings in the cleared forest. They found a way to link their playworlds to the world beyond, to make some pocket money, they cleaned up old bottles to sell, and they trapped, skinned and tanned rabbit skins.


The children are coming to terms with their own limitations, and with the realisation that they are rapidly approaching the horizon of childhood itself as it silently gives way to adolescence and a different way of knowing. They are playing far from the gaze of their parents, armed with machetes and knives, figuring it out for themselves, preparing to step out from this enchanted world, knowingly alone and having stared death in the eye.


Exhibition essay
Jane Stratton

Jane Stratton is the Director of the Think+DO Tank. She worked as a lawyer and public interest policy advocate/lobbyist for more than ten years before creating the Think+DO Tank to be a creative force in supporting communities to tell their own stories and to realise their own solutions to challenging issues. Jane uses storytelling and creative self-expression in her programs and workshops. Jane has a keen interest in the power of art to bring people together in publicly relevant ways.

Home: Wergaia Elder Professor Eleanor Bourke, silver gelatin print, 60x60cm, Koorie Heritage Trust, 2011



Eleanor Bourke and her sister wanted to make the Wergaia cloak to wear to the opening ceremony of the 2006 Melbourne Commonwealth Games. The Wergaia community gave them their blessing but did not want to participate due to the politics around animal rights activism. Aunty Eleanor believed her language group had to be represented at the Games as they had been denied their existence for so long. She wore the cloak with pride at the Melbourne Cricket Ground – a place once used for corroborees.
Home / On Country: Boonwurrung Elder Carolyn Briggs, silver gelatin print, 60x60cm, Koorie Heritage Trust, 2011



Carolyn Briggs champions the role of Indigenous cuisine in maintaining health and well-being. She recently closed the doors of her restaurant Tjanabi, in Federation Square, Melbourne, where Prime Minister Julia Gillard entertained United States Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton, in November 2010. The menu was based on Aboriginal people’s six seasons and their traditional way of eating organic, locally grown food.



Carolyn Briggs travelled to her Country on the Mornington Peninsula to take time to practice deep listening. She believes her people need to research where they came from, know who their ancestors are, their language and understand what it means to be Aboriginal.



As a language specialist and respected Boonwurrung Elder, Aunty Carolyn oversaw the design of the Boonwurrung and Wemba Wemba cloaks made for the 2006 Melbourne Commonwealth Games Opening Ceremony.
Home / On Country: Baraparapa Elder Esther Kirby, silver gelatin print, 60x60cm, Koorie Heritage Trust, 2011



Esther Kirby uses her art to bridge the cultural divide between traditional and contemporary life. Taught to carve emu eggs by her father Billy Murray, she has exhibited her work nationally and internationally, including at the International Women's Conference in Beijing, China in 1995 and the Melbourne Commonwealth Games in 2006. She is passionate about keeping her culture alive. She consults on Koorie culture and heritage for native title and works closely with young people in her community.



In her role as a Baraparapa Elder, Aunty Esther worked with her community to decide what stories would be told on the cloak about their Country. As the artist, she was responsible for expressing those stories through her own designs.
On Country: Yorta Yorta Elder Professor Henry Atkinson, silver gelatin print, 60x60cm, Koorie Heritage Trust, 2011



Yorta Yorta Elder Henry Atkinson is a professor at Monash University. He shows teachers ways to connect with Aboriginal students so they can receive the best education. He wants young Indigenous Australians to strive to be role models for the next generation – to work in business, law and medicine.



Uncle Henry was the spokesperson for the Yorta Yorta Council of Elders when his people lost their native title claim. That made him all the more determined to fight for his people's culture and their rights. Uncle Henry was raised in Echuca and is acutely aware how difficult it is for Indigenous people in south-east Australia to be recognised as Aboriginal people compared with those in Alice Springs, where his adoptive family live.



He wore the Yorta Yorta cloak at the opening ceremony of the 2006 Melbourne Commonwealth Games. The community at Echuca were involved in making the cloak with the support of artist Treahna Hamm.
Home (inside): Wemba Wemba Elder Fay Muir, silver gelatin print, 60x60cm, Koorie Heritage Trust, 2011



Fay Muir works with the Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages teaching juveniles in detention. She was the lead artist for the Wemba Wemba cloak and wore it as the opening ceremony of the 2006 Melbourne Commonwealth Games. Aunty Fay worked under the cultural guidance of Boonwurrung Elder Carolyn Briggs. She lives in Geelong.
Mt Noorat Hotel: Wergaia Elder Professor Eleanor Bourke, silver gelatin print, 60x60cm, Koorie Heritage Trust, 2011



Wergaia Elder Professor Eleanor Bourke is the proprietor of the Mt Noorat Hotel, near Warrnambool, She has dedicated her career to fighting for Aboriginal rights in her roles with the Victorian Aboriginal Heritage Council and Native Title Services Victoria. She has never lived on Country but was lucky enough to be raised by her grandmother Eleanor Pepper who told her stories about her Aboriginal culture. The pelican is a family totem, so she has pelican sculptures watching over her and bringing her good luck.
The Shed: Taungurung Elder Mick Harding, silver gelatin print, 60x60cm, Koorie Heritage Trust, 2011



Mick Harding did not know he was Aboriginal for the first 25 years of his life. As soon as he discovered his Aboriginality, he tried to understand what that actually means through his own art-making. Now he is actively involved in the Australian Heritage Council (AHC) and Native Title Services Victoria (NTSV). Most importantly, he is sharing his research and knowledge with his children.



He was the lead artist in designing the motifs on the Taungurung cloak. He held community workshops where stories were told and it was decided that each panel of the cloak would represent a creation story.
Home / On Country: Gunditjmara Elder Ivan Couzens, silver gelatin print, 60x60cm, Koorie Heritage Trust, 2011



Gunditjmara Elder Ivan Couzens surrounds himself with photographs of his grandchildren and Richmond AFL souvenirs in his Warrnambool townhouse. Even though he spent his early years on the Framlingham Mission and schooled his children in the city of Warrnambool, he has always identified strongly with his Country on the Western District of Victoria.



Uncle Ivan, known for his prowess on the football field, stands proud and strong on Thunder Point, overlooking Bass Strait. He has spent his life devoted to the Western District, championing stories about his Old People and actively keeping his ancestor's language alive. He compiled the Keerray Woorrong and related dialects dictionary, published by the Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages (VACL) in 1996. Uncle Ivan enjoys sharing stories about his ancestors, which inspired his daughters Vicki and Debra Couzens to start the possum skin cloak movement with Lee Darroch, Treahna Hamm and Maree Clarke.



As a respected cultural leader, he wore the Djargurd Wurrong cloak at the opening ceremony of the Melbourne Commonwealth Games in 2006. The cloak was made by his daughter Vicki Couzens and grand-daughters Yarran, Jarrah, Marlee, Niyoka and Kirrae Bundle.
Thunder Point, Warrnambool, Gunditjmara country, silver gelatin print, 60x60cm, Koorie Heritage Trust, 2011

Publications

The Tracker
3 March 2014
Writer Kate Munro
http://tracker.org.au/2014/03/the-knowledge-cloaks/

North Shore Times
24 January 2014
Writer Lauren Murada
http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/north-shore/sarah-rhodes-captures-a-piece-of-aboriginal-history-in-her-exhibition-homeon-country-at-gallery-lane-cove/story-fngr8h9d-1226809495335

Bush Telegraph, ABC Radio National
16 April 2013
Presenter Camerson Wilson
http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/bushtelegraph/2013-04-16/4632560


The Australian, Arts section
8 April 2013
Arts writer Matthew Westwood
Photograph Stuart McEvoy
http://www.theaustralian.com.au/arts/visual-arts/possum-cloak-revival-everyone-feels-great/story-fn9d3avm-1226614463545


The BorderMail, Albury
10 April 2013
Writer Aisha Dow
Photographer Ben Eyles


The Saturday Age
Page 3 of the main section
6 April 2013
Arts writer Dewi Cooke
Photographer Scott Schluter
http://m.theage.com.au/entertainment/art-and-design/return-of-possum-skin-cloaks-bridges-past-and-present-lives-20130405-2hcf3.html


The BorderMail, Albury
6 April 2013
Writer Aisha Dow
Photographer Scott Schluter


The Standard, Warrnambool
6 April 2013
Writer Matt Neal
http://www.standard.net.au/story/1412620/possum-skins-cloak-a-rich-history-in-the-south-west/?cs=72


SBS World News
5 April 2013
6.30pm


NITV News
5 April 2013
5.30pm

ABC Radio South-West Victoria (Warrnambool)
4 April 2013
in a news bulletin

Light Journeys
March 2013
http://lightjourneys.net.au/artists/sarah-rhodes-2/


The BorderMail, Albury
Pulse lifestyle lift-out, cover and full page inside
16 March 2013
Writer Sue Wallace


NY Times
5 June 2012
Interview by Matt McCann
http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/06/05/cloaking-the-aboriginal-past/


Smithsonian Institute online magazine Around the Mall
27 June 2012
http://blogs.smithsonianmag.com/aroundthemall/2012/06/ancient-traditions-new-stories-reviving-the-aboriginal-possum-skin-cloak/


Australian Geographic
May / June 2012
http://www.australiangeographic.com.au/journal/possum-skin-cloaks.htm


Culture Victoria
August 2011
http://www.cv.vic.gov.au/stories/possum-skin-cloaks/

On Country: Wiradjuri Elder Nancy Rooke

Home: Wiradjuri Elder Nancy Rooke

Yorta Yorta artist Treahna Hamm

Dorothy Napangardi, silver gelatin print, 60x60cm, 2007, edition of 5



Great Australian artists series

Tim Storrier, silver gelatin print, 60x60cm, 2006, edition of 5



Great Australian artists series

Charles Blackman, silver gelatin print, 60x60cm, 2006, edition of 5



Great Australian artists series
Margaret Olley, silver gelatin print, 80x60cm, 2005, edition of 5



Great Australian artists series
Martin Sharp, silver gelatin print, 60x60cm, 2006, edition of 5



Great Australian artists series

Tim Storrier and Jeffrey Smart, silver gelatin print, 60x60cm, 2006, edition of 5



Great Australian artists
Margaret Olley and Jeffrey Smart, silver gelatin print, 60x60cm, 2006, edition of 5





Great Australian artists
Window I, from The Window Series
Window II, from The Window Series
Window III, from The Window Series
Window IV, from The Window Series
Window V, from The Window Series
Window VI, from The Window Series
A mother struggles to understand her new identity as her son looks to her for his own.
The Artist's Lunch, Alice McCormick and Sarah Rhodes, Murdoch Books, 2008

The Artists Lunch

Dine with photographer Sarah Rhodes and writer Alice McCormick as they journey into the homes of Australia's most pre-eminent artists and unearth captivating stories of the artist's lives and work. Over lunch and in their own words, artists from John Olsen to Dorothy Napangardi, Anne Zahalka to Michael Zavros talk about how food influences their work, and go to reveal their unique personalities, beliefs, histories and habitats, as well as the processes and philosophies behind their art-making. The result is a surprising and sumptuous sensory feast, and reveals just what it is that fuels an artist's creativity. Find out more on The Artist's Lunch and Murdoch Books websites.



Dine with 18 of Australia's most celebrated artists ...

* Jason Benjamin

* Fred Cress

* Tim Maguire

* Allan Mitelman

* Mirka Mora

* Dorothy Napangardi

* Nell

* Margaret Olley

* John Olsen

* Luke Sciberras

* Jeffrey Smart

* Tim Storrier

* Savanhdary Vongpoothorn

* Philip Wolfhagen

* Salvatore Zofrea



An artist's table. Philip Wolfhagen's home in Tasmania.

The Artist's Lunch, Alice McCormick and Sarah Rhodes, Murdoch Books, 2008
Making a still life.

The Artist's Lunch, Alice McCormick and Sarah Rhodes, Murdoch Books, 2008
In the artist Philip Wolfhagen's garden.

The Artist's Lunch, Alice McCormick and Sarah Rhodes, Murdoch Books, 2008
Philip Wolfhagen makes a raspberry clafoutis.

The Artist's Lunch, Alice McCormick and Sarah Rhodes, Murdoch Books, 2008
A Wolfhagen in sheep's clothing, Tasmania.

The Artist's Lunch, Alice McCormick and Sarah Rhodes, Murdoch Books, 2008
Art Gallery of NSW director Edmund Capon visits Margaret Olley for lunch with artist Cressida Campbell and Nick Mitzevich. Nick Mitzevich was the director of the Newcastle Region Art Gallery and now is the director of the South Australian Art Gallery, 2007.



<i>The Artist's Lunch</i>, Alice McCormick and Sarah Rhodes, Murdoch Books, 2008
Still life, Margaret Olley's home, 2007.

The Artist's Lunch, Alice McCormick and Sarah Rhodes, Murdoch Books, 2008
Table centrepiece, Margaret Olley's home, 2007.

The Artist's Lunch, Alice McCormick and Sarah Rhodes, Murdoch Books, 2008
Art Gallery of NSW director Edmund Capon inspects the Degas sketch Margaret Olley donated, in 2008, to the National Gallery of Art, 2007.

The Artist's Lunch, Alice McCormick and Sarah Rhodes, Murdoch Books, 2008
Margaret Olley's kitchen, 2007.


The Artist's Lunch, Alice McCormick and Sarah Rhodes, Murdoch Books, 2008
Margaret Olley making white sauce in her kitchen, 2007.

The Artist's Lunch, Alice McCormick and Sarah Rhodes, Murdoch Books, 2008
Margaret Olley in her kitchen in Paddington, Sydney, 2007.

The Artist's Lunch, Alice McCormick and Sarah Rhodes, Murdoch Books, 2008
Margaret Olley's kitchen, 2007.

The Artist's Lunch, Alice McCormick and Sarah Rhodes, Murdoch Books, 2008
Hill End, NSW

The Artist's Lunch, Alice McCormick and Sarah Rhodes, Murdoch Books, 2008
Luke Sciberras sketching at Hill End, NSW

The Artist's Lunch, Alice McCormick and Sarah Rhodes, Murdoch Books, 2008
Detail in Luke Sciberras' studio

The Artist's Lunch, Alice McCormick and Sarah Rhodes, Murdoch Books, 2008
Luke Sciberras' Hill End studio

The Artist's Lunch, Alice McCormick and Sarah Rhodes, Murdoch Books, 2008
Luke Sciberras cooking octopus fettucine

The Artist's Lunch, Alice McCormick and Sarah Rhodes, Murdoch Books, 2008
Luke Sciberras' palette

The Artist's Lunch, Alice McCormick and Sarah Rhodes, Murdoch Books, 2008
Luke Sciberras picking tomatoes from his vegetable garden at Hill End, NSW

The Artist's Lunch, Alice McCormick and Sarah Rhodes, Murdoch Books, 2008
Preparing octopus

The Artist's Lunch, Alice McCormick and Sarah Rhodes, Murdoch Books, 2008
Inside Luke Sciberras' home

The Artist's Lunch, Alice McCormick and Sarah Rhodes, Murdoch Books, 2008
Luke Sciberras with Stella at Hill End, NSW

The Artist's Lunch, Alice McCormick and Sarah Rhodes, Murdoch Books, 2008
Inside Luke Sciberras' home

The Artist's Lunch, Alice McCormick and Sarah Rhodes, Murdoch Books, 2008
View over Bathurst, NSW

The Artist's Lunch, Alice McCormick and Sarah Rhodes, Murdoch Books, 2008
Tim Storrier entertaining at his former-Bathurst home with his wife Janet

The Artist's Lunch, Alice McCormick and Sarah Rhodes, Murdoch Books, 2008
Janet Storrier with their children

The Artist's Lunch, Alice McCormick and Sarah Rhodes, Murdoch Books, 2008
Tim Storrier carving the meat

The Artist's Lunch, Alice McCormick and Sarah Rhodes, Murdoch Books, 2008
Janet and Tim Storrier at the end of the dinner party

The Artist's Lunch, Alice McCormick and Sarah Rhodes, Murdoch Books, 2008
Tim Storrier resting on his bed

The Artist's Lunch, Alice McCormick and Sarah Rhodes, Murdoch Books, 2008
Tim Storrier's notecards

The Artist's Lunch, Alice McCormick and Sarah Rhodes, Murdoch Books, 2008
Dog's courtyard, Havana, Cuba, 2011
Baseball, Havana, Cuba, 2011
Dusk, Havana, Cuba, 2011
Diving, Havana, Cuba, 2011
Helados, Havana, Cuba, 2011
Man with dog, Vinales, Cuba, 2011
El Malecon, Havana, Cuba, 2011
Girl eating a mango, Vinales, Cuba, 2011
Swan Lake, Ballet Nacional de Cuba, Gran Teatro de La Habana, Cuba, 2011



Viva la revolucion, Central Australia, Cuba, 2011
Light, Cuba, 2011

Bio

Sarah Rhodes uses portraiture to explore the role of creativity in shaping identity.

A romantic fascination with the 'artist's life' inspired a series of artist portraits which culimated in the book 'The Artist's Lunch' (Murdoch Books, 2008). Now her focus is on 'coming of age' and the transition between childhood into adulthood.

Sarah's work has been published and exhibited internationally and are held in public and private collections, including the National Library of Australia, AlburyCity, Koorie Heritage Trust, Museum Victoria and the Margaret Hannah Olley and Charles Blackman trusts.

She has a Bachelor Degree in Psychology and Fine Art and a Masters in Publishing at the University of Sydney. Sarah's photography practice draws on her career as a newspaper photographer and museum collection online storyteller.
Standing in front of Bruce Gilden's exhibition at the LOOK3 Photography Festival, Charlotteville, Virginia, US, 2012

CV

Solo shows
2014 Home/On Country, Gallery Lane Cove, Jan-Feb

2013 Home/On Country, Albury City LibraryMuseum, 30 March 12 May

2012 Play, INQB8, Mandurah Contemporary Art Space, FotoFreo Fringe

2010 Great Australian Artists (2005 2008), NG Art Gallery, HeadOn

2009 Great Australian Artist, Sydney Writers Festival

2008 Great Australian Artists, Iain Dawson Gallery



Group shows
2014, Auckland Festival of Photography, 28 May – 20 June, 'Sophie' (2013)

2014 Photoville, Brooklyn, New York, 18 Sept-28 Sept, 'Sophie' (2013)

2014 Art & About, Paddington, Sydney, 19 Sept- 12 Oct, 'Sophie' (2013)

2014 Pingyao International Photo Festival, Shanxi, China, 19 Sept-25 Sept, 'Sophie' (2013)

2014 Sawtooth ARI, Launceston, Tasmania, August 8 - 30, selected images from the series Play,

2014 Singapore International Photography Festival Open Call, October - November, selected images from the series Play

2014 Aperture Summer Open New York, June -August, 'Maybe there is a beast ... maybe it's only us' from the series Play

2014 The Fence, Photoville, New York, July - October, selected images from the series Play

2014 30 x 30, Gallery Pejean, Tasmania, January, Zac

2013 Three Clicks, Gallery Pejean, Tasmania, May, selected images from the series Play

2012 December show, Gallery Pejean, Tasmania, Windows series

2012 Foto8 Summershow, Fear is nothing more than a dream (2011), from the series Play

2012 New York Photo Festival Invitational, Play (2010) from the series Play

2012 Divergence: photographs from elsewhere, FORM, Midlands Atelier, Perth, WA, from the series Home / On Country (2011)

2011 New York Photo Festival, Play from the series Play

2011 Photographic Center Peri, Turku, Finland, Play (2010) from the series Play

1998 University of Tasmania Art School group show (the self portrait), University of Tasmania

1997 University of Tasmania Art School group show, Long Gallery, Salamanca, Hobart

1995 University group show, Tin Sheds Gallery

1994 University group show, Tin Sheds Gallery


Awards
2014 Flanagan Art Prize Ballarat, Sophie 2013

2014 Bay of Fires Art Prize, Tasmania, finalist, Zac,

2014 HeadOn Portrait Prize Sydney finalist, Sophie, 2013

2014 DUO Magazine Percival Photographic Portrait Prize Townsville finalist, Sophie, 2013

2014 National Photographic Portrait Prize Canberra finalist, Sophie, 2013

2012 Moran Contemporary Photographic Prize Sydney finalist, Fear is nothing more than a dream, from the series Play

2012 Foto8 Summershow London, Fear is nothing more than a dream, from the series Play

2011 New York Photo Festival Photo Award , Best Personal Work, Play

2011 National Photographic Portrait Prize Canberra finalist, Canberra, Play

1994 Tin Sheds Gallery Award, University of Sydney





Publications
2014
CNN Photo Blog, 15 June 2014, Writer Lauren Russell
cnnphotos.blogs.cnn.com/2014/06/15/growing-up-in-the-tasmanian-bush/

North Shore Times, 24 January 2014, Writer Lauren Murada
http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/north-shore/sarah-rhodes-captures-a-piece-of-aboriginal-history-in-her-exhibition-homeon-country-at-gallery-lane-cove/story-fngr8h9d-1226809495335

2013
Bush Telegraph, ABC Radio National, 16 April 2013, Presenter Cameron Wilson
http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/bushtelegraph/2013-04-16/4632560

The Australian, Arts section, 8 April 2013, Arts writer Matthew Westwood
http://www.theaustralian.com.au/arts/visual-arts/possum-cloak-revival-everyone-feels-great/story-fn9d3avm-1226614463545

The BorderMail, Albury 10 April 2013

The Saturday Age, Page 3 of the main section, 6 April 2013, Arts writer Dewi Cooke http://m.theage.com.au/entertainment/art-and-design/return-of-possum-skin-cloaks-bridges-past-and-present-lives-20130405-2hcf3.html

The BorderMail, Albury6 April 2013, Writer Aisha Dow

The Standard, Warrnambool, 6 April 2013, Writer Matt Neal
http://www.standard.net.au/story/1412620/possum-skins-cloak-a-rich-history-in-the-south-west/?cs=72

SBS World News, 5 April 2013, 6.30pm

NITV News, 5 April 2013, 5.30pm

ABC Radio South-West Victoria (Warrnambool), 4 April 2013, in a news bulletin

The BorderMail (Pulse), Albury, lifestyle lift-out, cover and full page inside, 16 March 2013, Writer Sue Wallace

Timemachine Mag, issue 8, Much that is different from things in other lands, Hugh McNichols, on Play

2012
Sunday Times Magazine, 1 July, Foto8 Summershow 2012

Around the Mall, Smithsonian Magazine, Ancient traditions, New Stories: Reviving the aboriginal possum skin cloak, 27 June, Home/On Country (2011)

New York Times, Cloaking the Aboriginal Past, 5 June, Home/On Country (2011), Writer Matthew McCann

Australian Geographic, May / June issue, Home/On Country (2011)

TAKE Magazine, issue 2, March, Home/On Country (2011)

2011
Culture Victoria, Home/On Country (2011)

Timemachine, issue 3, Play

Northside Courier, Behind the lens: Photographer Sarah Rhodes, 12 October 2011, text by Polly Simons, photography by Yie Sandison.

2003-08
News Limited, Sydney

2001-02
North London newspapers, Trinity Mirror Group

1999-2001
The Examiner, Tasmania, Rural Press


Collections

AlburyCity collection

Koorie Heritage Trust

Mandurah City Collection (Western Australia)

Bunjilaka Aboriginal Cultural Centre, Museum Victoria

National Library of Australia

Private collections, including Charles Blackman Trust and Margaret Hannah Olley Trust

Harlem, New York, 2012

Contact

Sarah Rhodes
Based in Sydney

P / 61 400 100 850

E / photos@sarahrhodes.com


Tell me what you think of a picture

The Visual Storyteller

share your story, open minds
a multimedia production studio

The Visual Storyteller uses a social documentary style of storytelling to build deep connections between an organisation and its community.

Photography, video and digital stories have long been used as tools to provoke action. In today's visually literate world, they wield tremendous power in making social change or tipping decisions. The Visual Storyteller draws on fifteen years experience working in photojournalism, multimedia and online content production to ensure people's stories are told in a way that can influence outcomes.

Watch some videos on the visualanthropologis YouTube channel.

Client needs
>> Raise brand awareness
>> Attract new investors
>> Influence social change
>> Build a community around an organisation or idea

Services
>> Digital stories / Photo documentaries
>> Photography
>> Text

Email: photos@sarahrhodes.com
Mobile: +61 400 100 850
Help spread the word and 'like' The Visual Storyteller on Facebook

Photographing children in their imagination


Preserve this delightful stage of your child's life on film. Every child's magic is different and their imagination is a wonderland. These stages morph into each other so quickly so take time to capture these wonderful moments as they are so easily forgotten.



My approach is to take time to get to know your child so together we can create a whimsical, dreamlike image.



I specialise in photographing children's worlds in my own art practice. My current series, Play (2008 - ), looks at how children teach themselves survival skills and equip themselves for adulthood. This series has received much international acclaim. Play won the New York Photo Festival Award (2011) and was a finalist in the National Photographic Portrait Prize, Canberra (2011), the Foto8 Summershow, London (2012) and the Moran Contemporary Photographic Prize, Sydney (2012).



Pricing
Every family's needs are different so feel free to call to talk through your ideas. For packages and the price list, please email photos@sarahrhodes.com or call 0400 100 850.



Printing
Photographs are printed on the highest quality paper. There are two styles of printing: by hand in the darkroom on fibre-based silver gelatin paper or printed digitally on archival cotton rag.


Framing
The photographs look beautiful in a box frame, either floating or framed to the edge of the picture's white border.

Capturing the imagination
St George Open Air Cinema, Sydney Botanical Gardens
Jennifer Hawkins
Bec Hewitt and Isabelle Lucas at the races
Girl on her bed
Actress Alice Collie, head shot
Riding Sydney's ferries
Atomic Kitten
Musician Sarah Clarnet, head shot
Kids Craformzy Island Tea Party, Goat Island, Sydney Harbour